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Chicken Chow Mein

Submitted by: | website: Mia Cucina | Source: http://cucinasansevero.blogspot.com/

Chicken Chow Mein

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2012-06-22 Other
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Everyone's first experience with Chinese restaurant food was probably chicken, beer or pork chow mein, this is a copy cat recipe to help you re-experience that first encounter at home.

  • Servings: 4 to 6
  • Prep Time: 30 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients:

1½ lb Skinless/boneless Chicken Breasts, cut into approximately ½- inch pieces
2 Tbsp Peanut or Vegetable Oil
The Vegetables:
3 cups sliced Celery, thinly sliced on the diagonal
1 cup Yellow Onion, sliced thinly
½ cup Scallions, green tops sliced diagonally into 1" lengths
1 cup sliced Fresh Mushrooms
The Cooking Sauce:
1 can Good Chicken Broth
1 Tbsp Molasses
¼ tsp Grated Fresh Ginger
½ cup Soy Sauce
The Finishing Vegetables:
½ lb Bean Sprouts, rinsed and drained
5 oz Bamboo Shoots, matchsticked
5 oz can Water Chestnuts, drained and sliced
Thickening Slurry:
2½ Tbsp Cornstarch
¼ cup Cold Water
Service:
Cooked White Rice Sufficient, for 6 or package of crispy chow mein noodles

Directions:

create a thickening slurry:

Create a thickening slurry by blending the cornstarch and cold water.

cook the chicken:

In large skillet or wok over medium heat, cook chicken in oil until done, about 10 minutes. Remove from skillet.

saute the vegetables:

Raise heat to high and cook celery, yellow onion, scallions, and sliced mushrooms in the oil until crisp-tender; 2-3 minutes, stirring constantly.

create the cooking sauce:

Add beef broth, molasses, ginger, and soy sauce to the skillet or wok.

bring it all together:

Add the sauteed chicken, bean sprouts, bamboo shoots and water chestnuts. Bring the liquid to a boil. Add the slurry and continue heating and stirring until the liquid thickens.

service:

Serve over rice or dry, crisp Chow Mein noodles.

Helpful Tips:

Pork or beef can be substituted for the chicken to make pork or beef chow mein.